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Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup Ad From 1899

Scanned from an original 1899 Pearson's Advertiser magazine. Mrs Winslow's Soothing Syrup was a medicinal product formula compounded by Mrs. Charlotte N. Winslow and first marketed by her son-in-law Jeremiah Curtis and Benjamin A. Perkins in Bangor, Maine, USA in 1849. The formula consisted of morphine sulphate (65 mg per fluid ounce), sodium carbonate, spirits foeniculi, and aqua ammonia.


It was claimed that it was "likely to sooth any human or animal", and it effectively quieted restless infants and small children. It was widely marketed in the UK and the USA - as well as newspapers, the company used various media to promote their product, including recipe books, calendars, and trade cards.


In 1911, the American Medical Association put out a publication called "Nostrums And Quackery" where, in a section called “Baby Killers”, it incriminated Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup. It was not withdrawn from sale in the UK until 1930.

Original image dimensions
Pixels: 7200 x 7200
DPI: 300 dpi
Print size: 24" x 24"

Categories & Keywords
Category:Artistic
Subcategory:Sepia Tone
Subcategory Detail:
Keywords:ads, advertisement, advertisements, advertising, antique, art, broadsides, classic, ephemera, magazine, nostalgia, nostalgic, old, paper, rare, retro, unique, victorian, vintage, vintage ad, vintage ads, vintage advertisements, vintage advertising, wallmags

Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup Ad From 1899

Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup Ad From 1899

Scanned from an original 1899 Pearson's Advertiser magazine. Mrs Winslow's Soothing Syrup was a medicinal product formula compounded by Mrs. Charlotte N. Winslow and first marketed by her son-in-law Jeremiah Curtis and Benjamin A. Perkins in Bangor, Maine, USA in 1849. The formula consisted of morphine sulphate (65 mg per fluid ounce), sodium carbonate, spirits foeniculi, and aqua ammonia.


It was claimed that it was "likely to sooth any human or animal", and it effectively quieted restless infants and small children. It was widely marketed in the UK and the USA - as well as newspapers, the company used various media to promote their product, including recipe books, calendars, and trade cards.


In 1911, the American Medical Association put out a publication called "Nostrums And Quackery" where, in a section called “Baby Killers”, it incriminated Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup. It was not withdrawn from sale in the UK until 1930.

Original image dimensions
Pixels: 7200 x 7200
DPI: 300 dpi
Print size: 24" x 24"